The US banned around 1,500 books in school districts, representing more than 1,000 unique titles. The books targeted are primarily books about people of color (especially by Black authors), books that contain LGBTQ content, and titles that could easily be interpreted as promoting social justice.

Recently Brooklyn Public Library, one of the largest library systems in the U.S, announced that it has launched the ‘Books UnBanned’ initiative in response to the ban. This initiative will help people across the country between the ages of 13 and 21 to get a free eCard from the library.

 

Using these eCards, people can access around 350,000 ebooks and 200,000 audiobooks. People will also get access to the databases using these eCards.

For those people who have BPL eCard, they don’t need to wait to get frequently challenged books. This means those books are available with no wait time. These frequently challenged books include The Black Flamingo by Dean Atta, The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, The 1619 Project by Nikole Hannah-Jones, Lawn Boy by Jonathan Evison, and more. People are allowed to read the eBook version of these books on their smartphones, computers, tablets, or e-readers like Kindle.

Books unbanned
Using these eCards, people can access around 350,000 ebooks and 200,000 audiobooks. People will also get access to the databases using these eCards.

Not all teens have access to technology and reliable internet. So it’s important to make these books available physically in their school libraries.

“Access to information is the great promise upon which public libraries were founded. We cannot sit idly by while books rejected by a few are removed from the library shelves for all. Books UnBanned will act as an antidote to censorship, offering teens and young adults across the country unlimited access to our extensive collection of ebooks and audiobooks, including those which may be banned in their home libraries,” said the President of Brooklyn Public Library, Linda E. Johnson.

 

The ‘Book UnBanned’ will help teenagers fight the negative impact of increased censorship and book bans in libraries across the country, according to Brooklyn Public Library.

“Brooklyn Public Library stands firmly against censorship and for the principles of intellectual freedom—the right of every individual to seek and receive information from all points of view without restriction,” said Nick Higgins, Chief Librarian. “Limiting access or providing one-sided information is a threat to democracy itself.”

Books unbanned
The ‘Book UnBanned’ will help teenagers fight the negative impact of increased censorship and book bans in libraries across the country, according to Brooklyn Public Library.

Young adults ages 13 to 21 nationwide, can apply for a free eCard from The Brooklyn Public Library, unlocking access to the library’s giant collection of eBooks.

Teenagers can apply for The BPL eCard by emailing [email protected] Also, you can apply for the card by messaging their teen-run Instagram account, @bklynfuture. Click here to learn more about the plan.

The BPL has encouraged and invited teens to make and share videos, essays, and stories on the importance of intellectual freedom and the impact that book challenges and bans have had on their lives.

 

 

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